Laundry detergent

Laundry detergent

Posted by GITK Team on 20th Feb 2015

Powder or liquid, U.S. laundry detergent makers will often use at least one of three methods to make a thickener for their detergent; anionic, cationic or non-ionic.

Detergent making thickener begins with a feedstock: Crude oil or varied vegetable oil feedstock (includes coconut feedstock). Feedstocks originate in nature, making all feedstocks technically "natural." However, all detergent feedstocks become "SYNTHETIC" as they mutate during a complex acid chemical process - distillation, fractionation and hydrogenation. To make laundry detergent thickener, they start by mixing caustic acid and feedstock (perhaps a coconut oil feedstock) in staging tanks. This is then heated to extreme temperatures in order to remove the water content. Then they transfer the pre-thickened solution to a secondary tank and mix in another chemical to further process the thickening agent. Finally they perform the spray congeal process. This spray cools the product by using perhaps hydrochloric acid, hydrobromic acid, or sulfuric acid. After cooling..., the hardened surfactant chips are distributed to detergent makers across the U.S.

Discover why Rain Laundry Detergent + natural softener is widely different here.